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From Scratch to Scratch in one year - possible?


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#1 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:20 AM

Firstly Hello everyone. biggrin.gif

Is it possible, in your opinion, to take a golfer who cannot break 100 to a scratch round of 71 within one year? The golfer in question has a full-time and very busy job and a family life too which means that practice cannot be more than a couple of hours a day. He is 37 years of age and of average to poor fitness.

The challenge started this week and I'd be very interested to hear people's opinions as to whether they think it is possible.

Many thanks

John



#2 miike

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:31 AM

Is it possible ? In my opinion, no.

Are you the subject of this experiment ?



#3 butchy

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:32 AM

to be honest, i would have to say no. i have been playing golf now for about 3.5 years, and seriously for the last year and a half.
when i first joined my golf club, i played off 23, and 2 years later, i am now off 5. to do this, i have played 2-3 times most weeks, and practiced pretty much every night in daylight savings, and as much as possible in winter months, with the aim of being off scratch by the end of the year (2 year program).
going by what you have said, i dont think it would be possible to practice enough to get such a repeatable swing happening, which is needed to to play to scratch. shooting par, and being lucky are 2 seperate issues. everyone has their luck on the golf course, but no amount of luck will help you shoot par.
having said all this, i say good luck to him, and i hope he proves me wrong, as it would give hope to everyone.



#4 sirswingalot

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:33 AM

all i can say is GOOD LUCK!!!



#5 miike

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:36 AM

Works fulltime, very busy , family , and he's practicing TWO HOURS A DAY ??

Please let me know how this is remotely possible. I'd love to know.



#6 _Andrew_

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 06:13 AM

37 with a family, & he's going to practice 2 hours a day.

I don't know whether he can get to scratch, but the one thing I do know - He won't have a family by 40. (He will have a large monthly alimony though).



#7 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 06:33 AM

Woah - good replies and quick. Many thanks.

Yep it's me doing it. The two hours a day thing is slightly misleading. I anticipate ten hours practice a week at least. I basically work 9 a.m. 'til 6 p.m. at the moment - sometimes a bit more and a couple of hours on Saturday. I am properly busy (self-employed with 85 staff) but quite disorganised in the way I work. I also waste a vast amount of time in the evenings "faffing" about, watching TV, drinking wine, surfing the Net etc. The stuff I will cut out will be this NOT my family life. I'll work smarter at work and squeeze an hour at lunch 3 or four times a week, I'll get off my fat arse early on Saturday or Sunday morning and be back without having wasted the day fro my wife and daughter, I'll squeeze a regular hour or two in the evenings AFTER I've come home, cooked the tea and put my daughter to bed. I'm under no allusions that this is much easier to say than do.

The basic premise is to see whether, through a lot of discipline and ignoring of those standard day to day time wasting things I can achieve something that most feel would feel is actually impossible.

It's a challenge and I know it'll be very, very difficult but I do think if I really, really apply myself and make sure I do the

right

things that there is a ***** of possibility to it and that is all I need.



#8 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 06:40 AM

butchy

,

Your post is particularly interesting to me.

I'm intending to write a book about this and I suppose it's very much aimed at people like you. I'm trying to find out what the "right" things are to do. i.e. how much time to focus on what, how many lessons to take, how much practice versus play time, fitness and it's relevance, the mental game, technology etc. etc.

I feel that many golfers want to achieve set goals and try to get there through a process of a lot of play, a lesson or two (that they then ignore if they don't get immediate results), spend a lot of money on a new set of irons/driver/putter whatever but don't do the hard, hard slog of relentless practice at things like the short game.

I'm not lumping you into this category by any means - I'm just interested that you set a goal and didn't get there.



#9 miike

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 07:59 AM

HacktoScratch

I think luck has a lot to do with early success as well. Some golfers pick the game up naturally and improve quickly. Butchy seems to have done this. To get to 5 in 2 years is brilliant. I've gone from 27 to 13 in 4 years . There are people that have been playing for 30 years and can't get below 15 , no matter how hard they try.
I hope for the sake of your "experiment" you are one of the lucky ones.
Good luck



#10 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 08:05 AM

Luck rarely has anything to do with this type of thing in my opinion.

As Jackie Stewart the famous racing driver famously responded when asked how he had been so lucky "The more I practice the luckier I seem to get" biggrin.gif

If I trust to luck I won't get there.



#11 jeanmc

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 08:10 AM

IMO...no...

it took someone like Norman almost 3 years to get from starting down to scratch, and he was a youngster then, and practiced almost the full day...

if u have the dedication, and the patience, I can prob see you down to 18, perhaps 14 in a year...esp with only 2hrs practice a day...



#12 heckler

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 11:44 AM

Luck rarely has anything to do with this type of thing in my opinion.

As Jackie Stewart the famous racing driver famously responded when asked how he had been so lucky "The more I practice the luckier I seem to get" biggrin.gif

If I trust to luck I won't get there.

I always thought that quote was attributed to Arnold Palmer.

Luck may have nothing to do with but raw talent does, some people are just more gifted athletes than others.

Are you a complete beginner to the game or is it something you have previously played?

I've seen some very good players and talented athlete's put in more time and practise than your intending to and still not reach the objective you have set for yourself.

Possible to do yes, but extremely unlikely in my opinion but all the best with your endeavour, please keep us posted how you go.

You may find Timothy Gallwey's book The Inner Game of Golf an interesting read, from memory he was a novice who wanted to break 80 in a short period of time.

There have also been several golf magazines do what you are intending to do starting with average club players. I think they managed to raise them from average players to good average players.



#13 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 12:17 PM

Again many thanks for your comments

I used to play a bit up to the age of about 15. I really haven't played more than once a year since then and some times not at all for a year or so.

I played the "control" round on Wednesday with my professional and shot 103. i.e I basically have 32 shots to make in a year. I would not in any way regard myself as an average club player. She reckons it's extremely difficult but just possible and maintains I have the basic fundamentals of a good swing which is obviously a massive help. She will be working the whole thing with me and co-writing a couple of chapters of the book. Her odds are about evens that I'll make it if I do everything she says and commit to it. Obviously it's in her interests to help me succeed and she also probably is being generous with her analysis to keep me buoyed up.

I have read Timothy Gallwey's book and it is indeed a fascinating read. I've read pretty much all of Bob Rotella's stuff to and a bunch of others. Any further recommendations would be very welcome.

Hit 120 balls today concentrating on new grip, ball positioning and posture. Made good progress but obviously the task can seem hugely daunting at times.



#14 Trung

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 03:52 PM

I'm intending to write a book about this and I suppose it's very much aimed at people like you.

Is this thread a cheap way to promote your new book? :wink:



#15 ScratchtoScratch

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Posted 30 May 2004 - 05:32 PM

Hardly - I haven't written a single word of it yet!






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