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Par 3's - Maximum Length.


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#16 Weetbix

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 06:55 AM

So 250 yards maximum

Or rather 249 yards for par 3, 250 yards is par 4

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#17 Old Poppy

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 09:46 AM

Fractional par formula also applies to the total yardage of a golf course.

Yards X 0.0044 + 42.3 (18 x 2.35) = fractional par of course.

To work the distance has to be in yards.
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#18 Itchy4Scratch

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 10:23 AM

Fractional par formula also applies to the total yardage of a golf course.

Yards X 0.0044 + 42.3 (18 x 2.35) = fractional par of course.

To work the distance has to be in yards.

Where do these fractional par formulas come from Vardo? Is that how the USGA or R&A tells clubs to calculate their pars? 



#19 Old Poppy

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 11:29 AM

Where do these fractional par formulas come from Vardo? Is that how the USGA or R&A tells clubs to calculate their pars?

I found it in a scientific publication on golf (1969). It was used in Britain and USA to determine the SSS of a course. The score a scratch player should score on a course according to length. Length is the main element in the various handicapping systems in use. Obstacles and topography are factors in fine tuning the rating systems for handicap golfers (above scratch).
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#20 Itchy4Scratch

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 11:33 AM

I found it in a scientific publication on golf (1969). It was used in Britain and USA to determine the SSS of a course. The score a scratch player should score on a course according to length. Length is the main element in the various handicapping systems in use. Obstacles and topography are factors in fine tuning the rating systems for handicap golfers (above scratch).

That's pretty cool, I didn't have any idea that they had a formula for it. Do you ever use it to work out which holes are easy or hard for a particular course? 



#21 Old Poppy

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 11:39 AM

That's pretty cool, I didn't have any idea that they had a formula for it. Do you ever use it to work out which holes are easy or hard for a particular course?

IMO it should be used to determine the SS of individual holes. For example a par 3 with a fractional par of 3.2 should be considered a potentially harder hole than a par-4 with a fp of 4.0 or a par-5 of 5.0. What do you think?
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#22 Itchy4Scratch

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 11:40 AM

IMO it should be used to determine the SS of individual holes. For example a par 3 with a fractional par of 3.2 should be considered a potentially harder hole than a par-4 with a fp of 4.0 or a par-5 of 5.0. What do you think?

Yeah that's exactly what I was thinking, technically it should make it easier to set your goals for each hole throughout a round. Obviously if the fractional par is less than the actual par, you could start thinking about birdie. I might apply it to my home club Southern and see what comes of it. 


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#23 Yarn

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 01:29 PM

Ha..the magical fractional par formula is your friend here, Ah Ben.
0.0044 X yards + 2.35 = fractional par or number of shots to get down.
2.5 to 3.4 = par 3 (and so on).

:blink:



#24 Old Poppy

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 06:47 PM

I know yarnie. Somebody had too much time on his hands. The formula is only good for distances longer than 35 yards. A 35 yard par 3 would be a novelty.




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