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What Advice Would You Give A Beginner?


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#16 RobNewy

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 10:02 PM

Hypocrite.

You’ve listened to me before. I’m off 18 or 24 or something.


What are you 2 potatoes actualy off anyway?
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http://www.golf.org....icap/3010407059

So Max, if I don't respond to your comments, it's just because I'm ignoring you because I think you're an arsehole

#17 BumpunGrind

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 06:24 AM

Hypocrite.

You’ve listened to me before. I’m off 18 or 24 or something.

*listening

I'm still listening to you and do so every time we go to the range
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#18 xrman1954

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Posted 30 December 2018 - 06:03 AM

Back on track now people. 

 

I thing many beginners lack is distance with each shot. Mostly this is related to poor striking of the ball with off centre strikes and poor ball compression. 

 

I just trialed the Forte SS3  golf balls. I measured about a 5-10 m increase in distance, yet still they handles adequately around the greens. On the down side , they cut up quickly and are into the practice  bucket after one game.

 

Combining the strong loft irons and this ball can get the learner closer to the green on longer par 5s so that they can " attack" the pin. OK hit in the general direction. One advantage I noted of the Cobra one length wedges is that their descent angle is steep and the ball sticks on the green with distance balls.



#19 xrman1954

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Posted 30 December 2018 - 06:20 AM

While I am on a roll ( no pun intended) , other useful things that can help a beginner improve are

 

1) Work out your club distances on the range and list them on a card you carry with you when playing. Combined with a a golf GPS, this gives better club choice on each shot. 

 

2) work out a club that you can reliably chip or pitch with from about 40 m out from the pin. I see a lot of beginners trying to fly the ball to the pin, when there is nothing in front of the green preventing a bump and run shot. I have started using my 19 degree hybrid for this shot. When their is rough stuff in the first 20 m I use my GW to fly 50 % and roll the rest of the way.

 

3) I scribe a 4 mm wide line on my ball. I use a Fitzygolfpro tip to use this on the tee to help me align myself and also on the green for putting direction. I try and hit the putt using this line pointed at my target spot and assess my roll quality. wobbly line = off centre strike.


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#20 xrman1954

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 07:38 AM

Accurate chipping is the key to lowering your putting numbers. If you can leave it close to the hole with your chip onto the green, then 3 putts are less likely to happen.

 

My problem with chipping is that I tend to skull the odd one across the green and then take two shots more to get back to the putting out stage.

 

I found this You Tube video very useful is getting consistent results.

 

 

My next challenge is how to reliably get out of very hard bunkers. The surface is so hard that the wedges barely penetrate and then the bounce  causes skulls into  the back of the ball. I have tried ball back in stance and chipping with a 60 degree wedge , blade slightly open. It sort of works , but getting over the 60 cm bunker lip is hit and miss. Would  a wide soled  low bounce wedge be a good idea?



#21 OldBogey

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 08:10 AM

Opening the club face increases the bounce. But closing it will increase the likelihood of digging in.

If they are hard and dry, then you need to match the bounce to the surface and 'rub the surface' with the sole of the club.
If the sand is wet, I've yet to find a good solution, other than keeping out of them. If the club head digs in early, the ball goes nowhere. A little stronger and you hit the ball first, then it flies the green.

I recently bought a Rake sand wedge. They have an enormous amount of bounce. Every time I used it, it cost me two shots as I either bladed into the bunker wall or flew the green. I'm learning to control it by de-lofting a lot (forward shaft lean). At least I know it should be good whenever I come across fluffy bunkers.
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#22 xrman1954

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 12:51 PM

My thinking was a 58/60 degree wedge with about 4 degrees bounce might work ( widelow Cobra grind), but I don't want to buy one unless I am reassured it will work



#23 OldBogey

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 01:10 PM

My thinking was a 58/60 degree wedge with about 4 degrees bounce might work ( widelow Cobra grind), but I don't want to buy one unless I am reassured it will work

 

I have a 60/4 and I can't say that it cures all problems.  That's why I've tried the Rake.


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#24 Old Poppy

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 01:31 PM

My advice to a beginner is to learn the game from the green back to the tee - the way most professionals learn the game as juniors. Those who come to the game as adults rarely have correct concepts about the game. Usually the swing they start with becomes it for the rest of their golfing days. They may tinker and think they are making changes but in reality all they are feeling is different sensations with the same swing patterns.

Starting from the green backwards allows the player time to learn clubface control in putting, chipping and pitching, which leads to ball control withnthe various releases. Without this foundation the player will build himself a swing with inbuilt disfunctional elements that make the game so difficult. The easiest method to learn the game requires patience and little steps to start with.
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#25 Fill the Dill

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 01:33 PM

My advice to a beginner is to learn the game from the green back to the tee - the way most professionals learn the game as juniors. Those who come to the game as adults rarely have correct concepts about the game. Usually the swing they start with becomes it for the rest of their golfing days. They may tinker and think they are making changes but in reality all they are feeling is different sensations with the same swing patterns.
Starting from the green backwards allows the player time to learn clubface control in putting, chipping and pitching, which leads to ball control withnthe various releases. Without this foundation the player will build himself a swing with inbuilt disfunctional elements that make the game so difficult. The easiest method to learn the game requires patience and little steps to start with.


Fark me, thought you were dead.

Maxx. :)
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#26 Old Poppy

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 01:44 PM

Dropped in to wish you a Happy New Year mate.
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#27 xrman1954

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 02:20 PM

I have a 60/4 and I can't say that it cures all problems.  That's why I've tried the Rake.

Thanks OldBogey. 

 

I guess I need to practise more with what I have and try to develop feel for the strength of stoke.

 

I found this video that explains some options. My course has the really hard surface bunkers described in the video, so a chip style exit stroke is what I will try.

 



#28 Fill the Dill

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 02:33 PM

Dropped in to wish you a Happy New Year mate.


Same to you mate.

Been enjoying watching, Cam the second half of this year.
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#29 xrman1954

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 02:41 PM

SO it seems a low bounce Lob wedge is the go to get out of hard  packed bunkers



#30 Old Poppy

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 06:13 PM

Same to you mate.
Been enjoying watching, Cam the second half of this year.

Wandered around with him at Keperra during the PGA charity fund raiser the week after the PGA Champs. The course was set up so hard I felt sorry for the amateurs that forked out heaps to play. Cam had an easy 8-under - he really is a world class talent. The fame hasn't changed him one bit. He is also blessed without having an ego, which is very rare with talented people. Cheers Maxxie.
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