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Melbourne Plane Crash


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#31 Madambo

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 02:58 PM

Very nearly impossible.

There is very large stickers next to the fuel filler which specify which type of fuel.

Refuelers arent stupid.
They fill up aircraft every day and there are around 5 or so kingairs based at Essendon.

Arent the diesel nozzles bigger so they cant go into regular fuel tanks? I think its the case of cars?


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#32 Itchy4Scratch

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 03:04 PM

Arent the diesel nozzles bigger so they cant go into regular fuel tanks? I think its the case of cars?

Not sure about planes, but you can definitely put diesel in to a car that runs on petrol. I know two people who have done it. 



#33 Madambo

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 03:23 PM

Not sure about planes, but you can definitely put diesel in to a car that runs on petrol. I know two people who have done it. 

Im probably thinking of California where nozzles are bigger for diesel.


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#34 OldBogey

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 04:01 PM

The 'high flow' nozzles are bigger and unleaded holes are smaller (originally to stop people putting super into a car which runs on ulp).

That's for cars. I don't know about planes.
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#35 Schmuck

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 04:29 PM

Diesel is not used for aircraft, not suitable for a myriad of reasons.
There are generally only 2 types of aircraft fuel. Avgas and Jet A1.
The controls and accounting for every unique batch is so mind numbing that I would be amazed if the 'wrong' fuel was or could have been used.

Thats just my little piece of knowledge from times past.. ;)
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#36 RobNewy

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 07:05 PM

Arent the diesel nozzles bigger so they cant go into regular fuel tanks? I think its the case of cars?

No Mads.

Its not actually diesel nor is it petrol.

They 2 types of fuel used are Jet A1 which is an aviation turbine fuel, used on turbine powered aircraft. Everything from the KingAir that was involved in the crash, all the way up to the Airbus A380.
It is sorta kinda not really like diesel. It is a distant relative to kerosene

The other type is Avgas. It is 100 octane with a low lead content. It is basically petrol with a few bits and pieces added. This powers all the light piston aircraft in the universe.

These are 2 majorly different fuels, both in aroma and feel.

The Jet A1 is a very pale yellow colour with an oily smell and feel, similar to diesel. The smell is very apparent the moment the fuel cap is opened.

AvGas, is an extremely volatile fast evaporating petrol based (kinda) fuel. It is a green/blue colour.

The basic fuel opening in a lighter aircraft are both the same size, Avgas or A1.
The fuel trucks are the same, but with massive big Hazmat signs specifying which fuel types are in them.


The larger aircraft are pressure refueled, a totally different, unrelated system

I know this aircraft and i know the refuelers at Essendon Airport.
There is not a chance in hell this could have been a problem.

The PT6-42 engine in this aircraft is also certified to operate on Both types of fuels. Granted, there are limitations on how many hours the engine can run on different fuels, but they will run for a bloody long time.

Any questions, don't hesitate to ask.
I will answer as best i can

Edited by RobNewy, 07 April 2017 - 07:09 PM.

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#37 OldBogey

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 11:11 PM

Thanks for enlightening us all, Rob.




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