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Just like tennis?


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#1 AllegingBow

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:05 AM

Had a person in my playing group trying to show me a error in my swing. I don't recall his exact terminology but it seemed like his example showed me a swing similar to a tennis shot. Not straight through but more on a arc. If your familiar with cricket (which I'm not overly :/ ) I think I've been trying to hit a straight drive. Should I be playing more tennis?

#2 the draw

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:12 AM

This month's Inside Golf magazine has an article by Peter Croker on exactly the same thing.

#3 golfsavvy

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:09 PM

Golf is a combination of tennis, cricket, and baseball off the ground. You get to control your lie (serve, pitch, bowl) 18 times, and the rest of the time you have to respond to the coach. One ball flight performance is pretty difficult when you play on slopes variable grass conditions. Even tennis has serves, ground strokes, volleys, etc. You don't play a volley from behind the service line... Assuming you're talking about a ground stroke, a model golf swing can be similar to a tennis movement, on a different plane. I don't know the terminology, but a cricket batsman looks like he's often 'blocking' rather than swinging (could be wrong -- haven't watched a lot of cricket...).

#4 Ignoramus

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 06:29 PM

Had a person in my playing group trying to show me a error in my swing. I don’t recall his exact terminology but it seemed like his example showed me a swing similar to a tennis shot. Not straight through but more on a arc.
If your familiar with cricket (which I’m not overly :/ ) I think I’ve been trying to hit a straight drive. Should I be playing more tennis?

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The backhand and forehand top spin volleys are very similar to the hand and arm action on a normal golf shot, but on a different plane and with the target hand higher on the club. This gives a sense of space in the golf backswing which runs out in the through swing because the lead arm has to fit into a cramped space and at speed. In tennis there is no time to think of taking a backswing, everything is reaction and watching the ball meet the racket strings.

#5 Zenstb

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:40 PM

Alleningbow, As far as the coordination pattern or sequence of move they both produce identical patterns. The only difference is tennis is a vertical plane and golf in on an bent over plane. In this topic here is some comparison graphs of the movement of a tennis serve and the golf swing you will find these links at the bottom of my first post in this thread. Tennis swing vs golf swing

#6 Zenstb

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:40 PM

Alleningbow, As far as the coordination pattern or sequence of movement they both produce identical patterns. The only difference is tennis is a vertical plane and golf is on a bent over plane. In this topic here is some comparison graphs of the movement of a tennis serve and the golf swing you will find these links at the bottom of my first post in this thread. Tennis swing vs golf swing

#7 koiom K. Frenzy

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:44 AM

I like to imagine hitting a topspin forehand up the line when I need to shape a big draw around an obstacle. The tennis shot up the line often produces a right to left shape on the ball too.

#8 Zenstb

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:59 AM

I like to imagine hitting a topspin forehand up the line when I need to shape a big draw around an obstacle.
The tennis shot up the line often produces a right to left shape on the ball too.

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Koiom, Impressive there is a simple way to shape the ball never though about explaining it like that to golfer for shaping the ball. Thanks for the idea.

#9 koiom K. Frenzy

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:25 AM

Probably only beneficial if the golfer has played tennis to a reasonable standard though Zen :)

#10 GPJ_Longdriver

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:34 PM

Or ... playing a front foot "on-drive" when the ball is bowled across you on the half volley ....... outside off stump. Soft hands rolling more thru impact ...... to turn the ball back to the on-side. Probably only beneficial if the golfer has played cricket to a reasonable standard though Zen :)

#11 GPJ_Longdriver

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:36 PM

Or a ten pin bowler ...... aiming out towards the gutter and rolling the wrists at delivery to impart spin on the bowling ball to bring it back towards the middle pin. Probably only beneficial if the golfer has played ten pin bowling to a reasonable standard though Zen :) ... but you probably knew I was going to say that!!

#12 OldBogey

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 08:32 AM

A tip I saw was to steer the ball as though you are turning a steering wheel. You want the ball to go right to left, then 'turn the wheel' to the left in the swing. You want it to shape the other way, then turn to the right on the way through. You don't need to be a skilled tennis player, cricketer or bowler to understand that concept.

#13 Zenstb

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:36 AM

A tip I saw was to steer the ball as though you are turning a steering wheel. You want the ball to go right to left, then ‘turn the wheel’ to the left in the swing. You want it to shape the other way, then turn to the right on the way through.

You don’t need to be a skilled tennis player, cricketer or bowler to understand that concept.

Very true. Although Dr Koim and Professor GPJ their research is based on relatings feels to do excatly what you are saying. Understanding an concept is easy. Applying the skill or feeling the skill is the hard part. Dr Koim and Professor GPJ's research is a good way to relate with golfer who have a tennis, cricket and ten pin background to learn how to shape the ball using your feel. As Dr Koim and Professor GPJ out lined Probably only beneficial if the golfer has played tennis,cricket to a reasonable standard though:)

#14 Tango67

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 06:27 AM

what if you have played tnnis, cricket and 10 pin bowling to a reasonable standard whih application should one try and replicate....

#15 Zenstb

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 06:58 AM

what if you have played tnnis, cricket and 10 pin bowling to a reasonable standard whih application should one try and replicate….

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