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Keeping your eye on the ball


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#1 HeadPro

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:09 PM

Interesting article... Quote - Those who had worked on their gaze were more accurate than those who had fine-tuned their technique. Recent article in the New York Times

#2 vinum_coupe

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:22 PM

That's me down to a tee, and something I've been working on. I have a habit of losing focus. I'm just looking down at the ball. Almost misty eyed. When I concentrate on one particular piece of the ball everything improves. It's not easy to make it a habit for some reason.

#3 TheDart

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 08:07 PM

Also some very good putters are totally blind so maybe it is not so much where they look but the fact of a quiet mind. A caddy told me that his blind golfer could read the green better with his feet than he could with his eyes. Peter Thompson and Harry Vardon, two astute students of the game and holders of 11 Open Championships used almost the same words in saying that the key to golf was a quite and serene mind. Thompson must have read Vardon. A mind in this state he says, could dispatch hundreds of judgements in a matter of seconds. I also like letting my eyes go fuzzy this allows me to feel what is required. I imagine this is what that head band and Clear Keys stuff does. It is almost an "out of body" experience or maybe just "out of mind" experience or "in the zone" experience. While playing the shot I have no sense of result, only process, which is almost always very good. If it is not I can pinpoint the missing factor/s; some small detail that was not in the mix. What ever, the feeling is very pleasant - sort of like half a bottle of Scotch but no ill effects.That is why I think golf is a religion :)

#4 Ignoramus

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:38 PM

That's funny Dart.:)

#5 Ignoramus

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:40 PM

The elements that are missing from the above article is the relationship the eyes have with the neck muscles and how eye movement organises the movement of the body. One only has to swing the body back and forwards with relaxed arms for 20 reps with the eyes open and with the eyes closed to feel the differences in fluidity and smoothness. One would expect the movements to be better when the eyes are open, but with most of us that's not the case. The reason is that the eye movements of most people are not coordinated with their muscular activity. Carry this over to golf, where the movements aren't natural movement (in the sense of everyday life) and it is obvious that many golfers need to do specific eye exercises to increase their control of body movements by adding another dimension to eye/head movements.

#6 TheDart

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 08:54 PM

razaar, What kind of exercises do you mean? I ask all pupils to swing with their eyes closed. I can see the difference in five swings. The difference is caused by their sense of clubhead weight and the bodies accommodation to its motion. Once again when the eyes are closed you can better feel what to do. We should all hit some putts and chip shots with eyes closed and guess where they went before looking. This is the basis of Homer Kelley's "Secret to Golf" which he called Clubhead Lag and admonition to monitor the hands. Don't do anything with them but feel the pressure on the fingers which you can then aim. The corollary to Clubhead Lag is Downswing Blackout. Making a swing and not having a clue what just happened. Without this sense of touch we could not even find the tee in our pocket. The better the touch the better we play. Is that true or just bullshit?

#7 Ignoramus

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:42 PM

Dart The eyes aren't only for seeing. They have two muscle groups, focus and eye movement. The muscles that move the eyes are connected to the neck muscles which are connected to the shoulders. When we turn our head to the right the first thing that moves to the right are our eyes which organises the neck muscles, etc. Adding another dimension to this is turning the head to the right and the eyes to the left simultaneously. Another is turning the head and shoulders in opposite directions. We can make up our own exercises to do this, I've been doing them for 20 years. Coordinating focus with turning, especially when the eyes are moving against a shoulder turn is a necessary skill for golf, I would haver thought.

#8 Zenstb

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 12:14 AM

The only reason people have poor eye hand coordination is a lack of knowing what brain modality the golfer uses. It's where clear keys and pre-shot play a very integral roll. If the golfer isn't in present time during execution of a shot and eye coordination could come into to play. Although if the person has made a clear plan to what shot they are preforming they will have no issues. Feel players look down, visual look up and creative look up and right. If they do this during their putt etc they have taken their focus off the shot at hand and no longer in present time. You can say it's poor coordination between the eyes etc although the root cause is losing focus and not having a precise plan to begin with. When standing over the ball and has no plan he use his brain modality during the shot and what happens their eyes look away from the ball in the direction what brain modality they are using. Feel, visual, etc. So if a golfer is trying to hit a shot whilst thinking about it he will take his eyes off the ball. In the last 2 months I have been doing a course on brain modalities and blew my mind. I have even notice with my putting that I took my eyes off the ball. Although being aware of it I could not stop it. The guy who is training me is like the mentalist he can basically read your mind knowing about brain modalities. When he went through my entire thought process it boiled down to what my mind was doing which was impacting my eyes moving. In the end we set a precise plan, I didn't walk in until that plan was anchored. I remained focus on the plan keep it clear in my mind walking in pulled the trigger. The hard part is having belief and 100% trust. It took me an hour to finally be able to do this. When I finally achieve this, my eyes didn't move and held more putts. From what I learn I recon it's going to take me 3 months of hard work to implement this to my entire game. I always was aware of clear keys etc although I never full understood the concept of why we would do a 32 ball exercise. I understand why now. The secret to add to clear keys is train a precise plan. Get the plan right and clear keys never fails you. the hard part is training the brain and ourselves to do this.

#9 TheDart

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:33 AM

Keep your eye on the ball but you mind in your hands. razaar and zen are into a new thread, I hope.

#10 Ignoramus

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:05 AM

Dart Dr Arthur Jackson published a book "eye on the ball, mind on the game" in 1995. Jack Newton wrote the Forward. It is a book about the important role of the mind in golf. You have probably read it. It is about the mind's eye - visualisation. My previous post refers to how to improve movement, not only golf but improving faults we have in normal movement patterns, by working on eye exercises. My comments are only meant to provide forum members a point of reference should they wish to undertake further research. If you can teach your students to shift their eyes and focus as they turn their head in the opposite direction, they will consider you a genius. Because it allows the neck a freer range of movement, as well as improve the turn of the trunk. Also the eyes will stay quiet when the head moves and the shoulders tilt and/or turn.

#11 TheDart

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:32 PM

razaar, I will check it out as I have no idea what it could entail.

#12 GPJ_Longdriver

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:33 PM

Is it that important to keep your eye on the ball? In a full swing, when my front shoulder is going under my chin, and my body is turning, I can't truly say that I see the ball in any form of high resolution...... I just get a sense of where it is, as my head is also turning away from the ball slightly at the time. Same thing in the downswing, it's all just pretty much a blur, and I'm not really focussing on the ball per se at all .......... more that I'm just focussing on the "feel" of my golfswing ........ and trying to make my swing go on its intended path. Should we be directing all of our attention solely on the back of the ball, or instead ..... should we be focussing on the "feel of our golfswing"?

#13 Codboy

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:38 PM

Dart
Dr Arthur Jackson published a book “eye on the ball, mind on the game” in 1995. Jack Newton wrote the Forward. It is a book about the important role of the mind in golf. You have probably read it. It is about the mind’s eye – visualisation.

My previous post refers to how to improve movement, not only golf but improving faults we have in normal movement patterns, by working on eye exercises. My comments are only meant to provide forum members a point of reference should they wish to undertake further research. If you can teach your students to shift their eyes and focus as they turn their head in the opposite direction, they will consider you a genius. Because it allows the neck a freer range of movement, as well as improve the turn of the trunk. Also the eyes will stay quiet when the head moves and the shoulders tilt and/or turn.

The man who hits at the ball rather than through it has no sense of rhythm.
Secrets of the Master – The Best of Bobby Jones

razaar, have you any books or youtube stuff relating to the mind game as such. i'm starting to get anxious towards the end of a good round now, never had this before, must be old age perhaps ? edit, upon reflection, it was probably the 6 beers which got me through at the end perviously, very relaxed. don't drink at all during a game, not allowed :-(

#14 Francie

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:45 PM

Dart
Dr Arthur Jackson published a book “eye on the ball, mind on the game” in 1995. Jack Newton wrote the Forward. It is a book about the important role of the mind in golf. You have probably read it. It is about the mind’s eye – visualisation.

My previous post refers to how to improve movement, not only golf but improving faults we have in normal movement patterns, by working on eye exercises. My comments are only meant to provide forum members a point of reference should they wish to undertake further research. If you can teach your students to shift their eyes and focus as they turn their head in the opposite direction, they will consider you a genius. Because it allows the neck a freer range of movement, as well as improve the turn of the trunk. Also the eyes will stay quiet when the head moves and the shoulders tilt and/or turn.

The man who hits at the ball rather than through it has no sense of rhythm.
Secrets of the Master – The Best of Bobby Jones

razaar,

have you any books or youtube stuff relating to the mind game as such. i’m starting to get anxious towards the end of a good round now, never had this before, must be old age perhaps ?

edit, upon reflection, it was probably the 6 beers which got me through at the end perviously, very relaxed. don’t drink at all during a game, not allowed :-(

Deano is a smoker…….

Might need your ' pain medication' at the 9th hole to get you through now???

#15 Ignoramus

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:28 AM

Codboy I have just the thing for you- a 6 pack of some German pilsner which has no resemblance to beer - it's all yours. Share them with your group especially the Asian wannabe yarn swami-Kerr.:) I'll see what I can dig up that's light reading.




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