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The truth to increasing club head speed for a normal golfer.


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#1 Zenstb

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:42 AM

I put this video together for everyone to understand the truth how to increase club head speed and as we get older why we lose club head speed. This video is about an older golfer who lost distance and explained how he increased his distance. This video is the truth from 20 years of research I hope every one enjoys it. How to increase club head speed THE TRUTH

#2 AB_Uncut

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 07:10 PM

It's a good video Zen and I agree with what you are saying. So in the light of getting the TRUTH out there, I would like to ask you some questions if I may? These are for Zen to answer ONLY, not if you think you know, for Zen to answer. Let's be truthful here mate, it is time to get ALL the cards on the table after the farce of the other clubhead speed. Feel free to just list numbers mate and list responses. The questions will be detailed so there is no mistake in what they are asking... Okay... Question 1: So one side of the equation is co-ordinating movement patterns to build optimal sequencing patterns. Can this be trained by golf swing mechanics or is this optimally trainable via movement pattern drills such as what Zenolink focusses on? Question 2: Being that we are discussing movement patterns, obviously the lower body and ground connection if we are creating speed from the ground up (ideally) plays a major role. Is lower body stability speed related? By that I mean, that old guy only swings slowly in terms of speed, is his lower body stability irrelevant because he does not create much clubhead speed? The idea was posed that because he is not moving quickly he can't possibly be unstable, do you agree? Question 3: Is increasing movement pattern co-ordination the only factor in golfers creating more clubhead speed. I noticed the other day in your post that a point was glossed over by most.. "Hit the gym!". So is increasing functional strength also an important factor in maximising speed and distance performance? Isn't it a symbiotic relationship? By that I mean you can't just get stronger and hit the ball further, and you can't just increase co-ordination without getting stronger if you want to truly maximise performance? Question 4: I know you guys use repetitive co-ordination exercises to increase movement pattern co-ordination. I also know that if you are doing them correctly they are physically taxing and can cause muscular fatigue. As such is co-ordinating movement patterns is improved but is muscular contraction speed and power also addressed by training in this manner? Question 5: In your opinion, senior golfers? Obviously through you fitness training you learnt about muscle degeneration with age. How can this be offset in terms of aged golfers? Does muscle degeneration also play a role in the declining distance experienced by senior golfers and a role in the loss of co-ordination patterns? Can they improve co-ordination patterns without also improving their contractile strength and muscle activation? Question 6: Do you personally perform functional strength training to improve both your golf swing effiency and power production? Why do you do that if you do? Question 7: Can you explain dynamics of the club in motion and what Zenolink has found in their research regarding driver length. Is the industry heading in an optimal direction for "normal" golfers by providing lighter and longer shafts for increased speed and distance? Question 8: Is clubhead speed the over riding factor in producing distance? Or is ball speed the actual factor that incluences how far a golf ball travels (in addition to optimal launch dynamics to create optimal flight conditions)? What other factors impact ball speed production other than clubhead speed? Acceleration (in terms of normal golfers), Maintaining force through impact as opposed to "throwing" the club at speed at the ball? Centredness of impact? Optimal launch at impact? Optimal flight dynamics in terms of launch, ball speed and spin rate to optimise carry? Have you ever seen a golfer produce high clubhead speed but was not maximising their distance in comparison to someone with lower clubhead speed who is very efficient in their movement and delivery? Question 9: Can you explain why "X factor" is such a fairy tale in terms of torquing the upper body vs the lower body? Is achieving 120 degrees of shoulder turn like we hear often actually anatomically possible? Do the shoulders work as a unit or are they independent in their movement? Can you briefly explain the stretch shortening cycle and how this is the most major contributor to speed and power production in the human body from a human movement point of view? Question 10: How do physical limitations impact the efficiency of golfers (and athletes in general) creating an efficient kinetic link? If there is a breakdown or weakness is one of the chain components is the kinetic link efficiency compromised in any way? 10 questions will do for now, but I think this is an important thread in getting some truths out into the industry rather than the continued proliferation of "jargon" and "traditionally misformed beliefs". Congratulations mate for having the strength of conviction to actually address this, I know you face an uphill battle in the industry with people who can't embrace sports science over tradition, we all do.

#3 GhettoGolfer

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 07:17 PM

Reading with interest now.

#4 AB_Uncut

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:30 PM

Stayed tuned GG, we are finally going to discuss some honest truth about things in a thread, not flights of fantasy mate. If people begin to read rather than try and teach, a learning opportunity will be experienced by many! THIS IS NOT GOLF SWING MECHANICS, this is a human movement and sports performance discussion. This is the underlying stuff on which all the other superficial stuff that is bandied around in is actually built! I know Zen knows his stuff when it comes to this area, and I am sure he will let you know that discussions we have on the phone is all on the same page. As I have said once before, there is no shame in not knowing this stuff no matter how much experience you have or what you think you know, these are the principles that no athlete escapes and on which all technical swing mechanics are built. The opportunity is here to learn no matter how good/right you think you are or how much knowledge you think you possess! The truth is that the golf industry is decades behind other sports in the way it teaches athletic performance! DECADES!

#5 StuGolfer

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:37 PM

My coach increased my swing speed significantly by getting my hands to whip the club through the ground zone. Of course the change has meant I'm learning again how to control the direction

#6 Mekat

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 10:05 PM

AB, I think your questions to Zen along the lines of human movement are not just pertinent to an ageing body, but to those of us who have weaknesses through injury or other conditions that impact on our performance. I have weaker legs than a lot of people, so I do not push from the ground up so much, rather I compensate in other ways; So Zen's responses to your questions will make interesting reading for more than the 'chronologically challenged'.

#7 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 12:02 AM

AB, Thank you for asking some excellent questions. Question1: Swing mechanics can not train a coordination to facilitate a kinetic link. Swing mechanics is motor skills learning. The kinetic link is neurormechanics, what people have to start to understand is the golf swing sequence that is spoken about (the kinetic link) has absolutely nothing to do with golf. The kinetic link is the most effective way the how the human body can coordinate rotational movement to generate motion, speed and power. Any rotational sport facilitates a kinetic link whether it's throwing or tennis or baseball, these same movement sequence applies. We measure all rotational sports to know for sure 100%, this is the truth. To train a kinetic link you have to train the human body how to coordinate rotational movement starting from the ground up. You have to break the kinetic link into smaller movements and train each part of the link in blocks or chunking to coordinate a set movement pattern. I put a video explain how PST came to be, Years ago Chris use to only provide data for coaches and clinicians. What he discovered was even though you improved people physical limitations and improved their swing mechanics the kinetic link of the golfers did not change in sequence or coordination. Houston we have a problem. This is why ZenoLink spent 20 years researching to develop PST to train coordination patterns. This doesn't just apply to golf, same for tennis etc results were the same. Question 2: The most common break down older golfer have is lower body mechanics or poor stability. They have poor connection with the ground. Tour players use the ground to produce lower body stability, acceleration and declaration. Average golfers they produce superficial lower body mechanics there is three types but I will talk bout the 2 most common break downs. The first of these is called sliding hips, which occurs when the hips move laterally to the left without rotating on the downswing. No rotational speed is created. Muscles aren't properly loaded between the lower and upper body to produce stretch/ shorten cycles of the muscles. When muscles aren't loaded properly there is diminished energy created to be passed to the upper body. In many cases, sliding hips also indicates an excessive spine tilt. When the spine tilts, muscles that work to rotate segments around the axis of the spine become asymmetrical in that one shortens and the other side lengthens. This asymmetry cause inefficient generation of power or speed and can cause increased stress on the back and joints, resulting in back injuries. The second is called “spinning hips” which occurs when the golfer forces the hip segment through the swing too quickly. This creates excessive lag between the lower body and the upper body.Muscles are over stretched and you lose the stretch/shortening of the muscles. When the hips are spun superficially you have no ground forces acting upon the lower body to slow them down, to enable the muscles between lower body and upper body to contract. Typically the upper body never catches up.The trunk musculature is never used to accelerate the upper body or to pass energy created by the hip segment rotation to the shoulder segment which means lost power and lower club head speed. As you can see these break downs are a result to poor stability in the golf swing. I will answer more questions in another post.

#8 AB_Uncut

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 12:44 AM

Absolutely Mekat, you are spot on the money. If you have muscular imbalances, weaknesses, physical limitations, injuries (pre existing or current) or simply aged related degeneration, ALL of these things impact the way in which you create and store power, and impact how you can create optimal movement patterns. Of course all of the questions I have asked Zen I know full well what the answers are to these questions. I think it is important though to address it in question form so you guys have the opportunity to think and learn from the process. I also know that Zen will provide us with no nonsense answers that are based on science NOT speculation. I am also hoping that if people hear it from another source such as Zen we will actually make some headway if people start listening and start asking questions also. People will have you believe that you can't overcome pre existing conditions and injuries. That age is just something that we need to accept and "Oh well, there is nothing you can do about it". This is pure unadultered rubbish Mekat. Anyone can improve on anything with the right advice and the correct approach from people who actually know what they are talking about. Strength and performance training is my background and specialty. There is nothing that can't be improved or overcome with specific training. There is no need for it to be difficult, there is no need for it to be time consuming and there is no need for it to be overly taxing. I look at it this way "Something is better than nothing at all!" Even if you were only capable of performing limited exercises in a limited time space, isn't a small improvement of even 10% still an improvement that can enhance not only your sporting ambitions but your overall quality of life? If we think there are fairy tales of advice in the golf industry, I can tell you for a fact that when it comes to the fitness industry the volume increases ten-fold. Here is a fact, no nonsense appraisal of the golf fitness industry... There is not one decent golf training program out there currently... NOT ONE! And I will tell you why? Rule number 1 of sports performance conditioning and it is very simply: The program must recreate the physiological needs of the sport of which it is being designed to be used for. Pretty much every golf training program fails in this most basic programming requirement! Think about the sport and anyone is capable with rational thought... Golf involves a complex multi joint, multiple muscle motion that requires massive amounts of physical co-ordination. This motion is performed in a dynamic power ballistic fashion (simple terminology: fast and powerful) with an implement that is of submaximal load. (Simple terminology: A golf club weighs no more than 500g's, the ability to bench press or squat 100's of kg is not necessary for performance). This motion we call the golf swing is performed once dynamically and then is followed by a period of walking and rest (waiting for the next shot). This process above is repeated over a 4-5 hour period covering 5-6kms generally. Now the personal problems I have with basically every fitness program on the market are: * Single joint exercises: (Eg. A biceps curl): The golf swing takes co-ordination of multiple muscles over multiple joints in an unstable pattern of movement. Working one joint without having to co-ordinate it with another joint is therefore not optimal. * Multiple repetitions: No unless there is a specific reason for doing so, like pre fatiguing a certain muscle movement or joint to encourage the development of a weaker muscle movement, there is no sporting reason to do more than 2-4 repetitions at most of any exercise. Most programs run on repetition schemes of 8+ (like bodybuilding programs). Name a period in the game of golf where you have to hit 8 golf balls or more, or make 8 swings on more at any one time. It is therefore poor sports science to program multiple repetitions, the sport doesn't require it. * Anatomical screening and programming. Basing a program simply on individual areas of the body due to seeing the way it moves is actually superficial and ineffective. The body uses complex movement patterns to generate power and efficiency. Without programing to improve both the co-ordination and the physical requirements for these complex movements, you are not changing or improving the athlete to perform the task their sport requires. Stretching for example is the biggest and most misused form of exercise in golf! It is programmed at the wrong times of exercise or sporting practice, and it actually impedes one of the most important physiological responses we require in golf... The stretch shortening cycle (and Zen will cover that I am sure). NOBODY doesn't hit the ball far enough because they are not flexible. I am very inflexible, I never stretch and I guarantee I would outdrive at least 90% of the golfers on ISG! You hear all the time, "He turns his shoulders 120 degress and his hips 40 degrees and that is why he hits the ball long" 1. The right shoulder only turns a maximum of 30-45 degrees beyond the right hip, so how can you get differentials of more than 45 degrees? 2. The shoulders move independantly of one another (try it, you can move the left shoulder without ever moving the right and vice versa!). Guess what? 2 shoulder blades that are unattached. How do the shoulders ever move as a unit? 3. If it were true and flexibility in the amount you could "torque" your body was the main influence of distance and power in the golf swing, answer me this: Why do men hit the ball further than women when women are more flexible than men by a large margin. Kids and juniors who are hyper mobile, should therefore be the longest hitters of a golf ball on the planet. But guess what, they aren't. The final thing that annoys me about golf fitness programs is this: * One type of muscular contraction trained primarily. Most programs lift weights. This is one type of contraction. But in a golf swing there are multiple types of contractions. "Bracing" or "Static" or "Isometric" contractions of muscles where there is no movement but there is a muscular contraction play a vital role in the golf swing and in power generation. But they are never discussed and these programs certainly never train them! Mekat I am seriously hoping that this thread will work the way it is designed and it will be a learning experience for all who read it. You can build all the mechanics in a golf swing you like, but if the physical limitations and physiological movements are not addressed and not being trained, you are on the fast track to nowhere! How can you improve mechanics when you can't even facilitate basic human movement requirements of the sport? It is like teaching an infant the optimal running technique when they can't even facilitate walking yet. The cart has been before the horse for far too long in this sport! Hence why I say it is decades behind all others!

#9 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 01:01 AM

Question3: Ab lets look a Greg Norman, he has a kinetic link and we worked close with Peter Draovic who was Greg's strengthening and conditioning coach. Greg Norman has a kinetic link, which ment that his club release occurred at the same point in his downswing every time. When Greg hit the gym he trained specific to the activity which was golf. Greg trained in the gym training the muscles he used to facilitate a kinetic link to more be power explosive. He trained his muscles to stretch and shorten faster to increase rotational acceleration and deceleration of the stretch shorten cycle he used in each body segment to drive the kinetic link. What Greg did is increased the rotational speeds for each segment in his kinetic link. Which as result increased the distance Greg struck the ball. This never effected Greg ball striking accuracy because the sequence did not change when Greg released the club head, this happened automatically. So his rhythm and timing was never effected. With a good kinetic link the club releases on it's own. So you don't have to time when to release the club head. Why Greg increased distance from working out in the gym is because he had a kinetic link. The speed and power gained in the gym could be utilised and delivered at the point of impact. The problematic issue I see with functional training is it is not specific to the coordination pattern or rotational movement we facilitate in the golf swing. The other problematic issues I see is when people hit the gym they have a break down in coordination to facilitate a kinetic link. So even though they hit the gym get stronger or more power ballistic this still will not be utilised at the point of impact because they have a power leak in their kinetic link. They will still losea large proportion of this speed before the point of impact. Other issues I see is to play golf they heavily rely on rhythm and timing to release the club or square the face up. They achieve this by grinding thousands of balls. What happens is when they hit the gym they are actually amplifying their break downs in coordination, They may hit the ball a little further although lose accuracy and consistency because now they have upset their rhythm and timing they so heavily rely on to strike the ball accurately and consistantly. In addition as I said previous they aren't doing gym training specific to rotational movement. BUT even if they did do they right training specific to train the right muscles groups or stretch/shorten muscles for rotational movement to facilitate a kinetic link in the golf swing, They WILL NOT utilise all this power explosion gained on the golf course because they still have a break down in their kinetic link and a large majority of this power will be lost prior to impact.

#10 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 01:37 AM

Question 4: AB, When people do PST and learning a certain patterns they only do a certain amount of reps in a certain amount of sets every second or third day depending on how well there body recovers. Otherwise as you said they get muscle fatigue and don't get any benefits or progression of improvement. We do block training over a 6 to 8 week intervals, when we re-test somebody after 6 to 8 weeks. If a specific patterns has not been achieved they keep on doing the drills until they do achieve a certain pattern we are seeking. They have to build a foundation first and until they develop a certain foundations of basic movement, they can't step up to more advanced and complex movement patterns to advance their kinetic link. But this is where my expertise come into play when I monitor people executing the drills I know whether or not they are coordinating the right patterns to determine if they are ready to be re-tested to step up to the next level. Peoples contractions and speed are enhanced by doing PST although off course that is going to happen considering they have never used the Stretch/shorten cycle in their golf swing before. Once they can coordinate these patterns if they want to enhance the contractions to be more power ballistic they are going to have to do functional training specific to these patterns. This is where we do functional specific training with athletes. Very important it has to be specific to these patterns though.

#11 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 02:23 AM

Question 5: This is a pretty tough question to answer, what I can say is once you have a kinetic link you don't lose this coordination pattern no matter how old you get. We have a guy 72 years old who has gained 40 yards in 12 months, he's gone from a 20 handicap to 7 in this time frame. Although he worked hard he was prepared to do his PST and was prepared to also work on his physical limitations, he was prepared to work out in the gym to increase his fitness and strength. The video some what answers this question. With older golfers the truth is they don't have a kinetic link or good coordination of movement in the first place. With muscle degeneration, this is through neglect of poor diet and not looking after yourself keeping active and moving. I know it is more complex and more to this off course. As people get older they have to work harder to keep themselves in good condition. If they work out they can get stronger than what they are currently. My Grand father is 85 and he runs rings around most people, he still very active and why is that? He looked after himself with diet, exercise and keeping active. he has also had 2 hip replacements as well and recovered from doing the right things. He's batting for 100 and will make it easy. Any older golfer can improve if he is prepared to put in some hard work to improve.

#12 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 03:14 AM

Question 6: Sure I hit the gym although it's specific to the kinetic link, the training is all based around increasing the power out put of my kinetic link. I focus on improving the dynamic physical limitations that affect my golf swing. Although I have spent 2 years improving my kinetic link doing PST so I could utilise the gym my training to improve my golf. Question 7: The problem is by making the club lighter allows to create enhance their superficial speeds they produce to create move club head speed. they may hit it a bit further although they hit the ball further side ways as well. The length adds external to the system, if a club is to long for the golfer this slows down their arms speed, this both impacts the kinetic link or a guy who produces superficial speed. T Jason Zuback great example his driver was 50 inches, even though he had a very light weighted driver, although the length of the driver add dynamics weight which adds what we call an external force to the system. The weight dynamical is to heavy to allow Jason muscles to contract between his upper body and arms.This caused his arms to slow down prematurely and he lost a large proportion of the speed he produced from the ground up at the point of impact. As a result he lost 40 mph of speed at impact. We couldn't convince him to take 2 inches off his driver, this would then allow his arm muscles to contract, increasing his angular speed or lag and as a result increasing club head speed, ball compression and deliver all the speed he produced from the ground up at the point of impact. Length and weight of the club has massive impacts on your kinetic link it's crucial to have the right dynamic weight and length.

#13 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 04:09 AM

Question 8: It's not just about club head speed, what is most important is how much force you apply to the ball, the more force applied, the further the ball goes. Ball speed is more important than club speed to be honest. With club head speed , there is two speeds, there is linear and angular speed. Linear is club path speed, angular is ball compression or force applied to the ball. What we all know as club release. You can have two guys who have the exact same club head speed although one guys hits it 20 yards further. Why is this possible? The guys who hits it 20 yards further has a higher angular speed or club release speed, in which he is applying more force to the ball or has better ball compression. Angular speed is the last part of the Kinetic link. As speed and energy is produce from the ground up this is transferred into the arms and club. The angular speed is the measurement between the club shaft and the right wrist ######. When we create speed from the ground up we generate lag or the right wrist ***** increasing the angle of the shaft between the right wrist and the shaft. This is very important just prior to impact the arms slow down, the club accelerates away from the right wrist and the right wrist ###### and angles reduces the club keeps on accelerating. The angular speed imparts more speed, force and compression on the ball. You are applying more mass on the ball. Its quite frequent I see a guy with a club head speed of 100 mph and a guy who is 92 mph. The guy with 100mph his angular speed at impact is only 500 degrees per second and only utilise 45% of his angular speed at impact. The guy at 92 mph his angular speed is 1200 degrees per second and utilise 90% of his angular speed. He will bomb it past the guy who has the higher club head speed, because he imparts more force and mass on the ball.

#14 Zenstb

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 04:13 AM

Question 9: AB the question is should anyone EVER try to MANUFACTURE x-factor or separation between the pelvis and thoracic during the BACK SWING. It serves absolutely no purpose. The amount of separation created during the back swing is not important, the dynamics of core muscular loading are important. The dynamics of core loading include rate of stretch, line of action, response and rate of shorten and these all happen dynamically during the downswing. The manufacturing of separation or x-factor during the back swing only serves to do two things, neither of which are good. 1. put the body in a mechanically disadvantaged position – this negatively impacts the ability to change direction, sequence the kinetic link and puts the joints at higher risk of injury. 2. rob the muscles of the ability to create force by exceeding the natural optimal length tension ratio needed to shorten/contract in a ballistic way. Also, just like the amount of separation during the back swing is not important to performance, its not the amount of separation during the back swing that can contribute to increased loads on the joints of the spine. It is more the fact that in order to manufacture separation the body relinquishes connection to the ground and muscular tension which is necessary to maintain stability. When the muscles “relax” in order to accommodate greater separation, the support structure surrounding the spine is compromised, the joints are less stable… when the body then changes direction in this manufactured relaxed state and applies a significant amount of muscular force through the core the joints are at higher risk for injury. The thing to focus on is the initiation of the change of direction, NOT back swing separation. Separation and back swing “turn/rotation” will be dictated by your natural physical attributes including range of motion… if you change direction effectively and you will more effectively create power. In the article on xfactor – author Ron Kaspriske states “It’s hard to argue that the torque created by restricting your hip turn while allowing your shoulders to turn as far as they can will help generate a lot of speed and power in your swing.” The primary point of contention I have with this statement is that the body doesn’t coil up like a “big spring” in the back swing. Let’s use examples that get away from golf swing to hit the point home – if you were trying to teach someone how to jump higher, how much time would you spend on how deep their pre-load squat was? if this was the case then guys who wanted to jump the highest would bounce their butts off their calves before jumping… I don’t see too many NBA athletes or Olympic high jumpers doing that, right? the physiology in the golf swing is no different. Whether the lower body stays stationary or you allow it to rotate, whether the swing technique is stretched out and long or short and compact… it still boils down to the dynamics of the pre-load – shorten of the muscle or stretch-shorten. The amount of stretch becomes secondary is more a function of the dynamics and not manufactured separation.

#15 Shanks4ever

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 05:51 AM

This topic should be namedhow to apply more force to the ball. Force = mass * acceleration Surely mass should also be spoken about. Mass is the club head.




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