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Question about personal par


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#1 Weeti

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 06:56 PM

Let me start with what I understand personal par to be, because this may be the cause of my misunderstanding. Based on your handicap you readjust the number of shots that you have on a hole to get to the green in regulation. So off 18 you get an extra shot on every hole. My question is how do you, or do you allow for a 'short game handicap'? What I mean by that is even the pros don't get up and down every time. So in the example of playing off 18 would you split the 18 up and say give yourself an extra full shot on the 9th hardest holes and allow the other 9 shots for short game?

#2 Daves

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 07:26 PM

My thinking would be that Par is based on 2 putts per hole. Hit the green in reg or get up and down off 18 and it is a personal birdie, otherwise you have played to your handicap.

#3 TheWeekendGolfer

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 07:28 PM

Whose index would you be using for the holes? The course one or your own? Because each hole's difficulty may be different for every player and you might find some are easy putts and long hits and others are short hits and tough putts, and some others are hard everything and again others easy everything.

#4 VijayJay

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 07:52 PM

Playing a Stableford, scoring wise, you would use the courses ratings. The whole point of personal par is to have more accurate expectations. Wirh holes you do get a shot on, you have the "insurance" that you don't have to thread a 220m driver, you can in reality you can hit 5 iron then short wedge to allow yourself a guaranteed safe approach to the green. The bottom line is, we have shots on holes because we need them. If we could course par every hole everytime we played we wouldn't have any shots. Personal par is about being realistic and playing the game safely to our ability. You will improve a brazillion fold this way because you are eliminating the risk of big numbers.

#5 TheWeekendGolfer

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:02 PM

The issue is that there isn't a great element of risk in putting. If you miss, you putt again. If you land in a bunker or OOB, you're in trouble. So personal par is about risk and putting deficiencies have similar consequences for all golfers, no matter the handicap.

#6 deepdivot

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:07 PM

Yep someone posted that u should take the extra shot on the hardest holes only with at ratio of one three, so if ur off 18 the 6 hardest holes get there in an extra shot because u r spot on if u take an extra shot to get to every hole then u have to hit every green and 2 putt every green which is going to happen of ur off 18. Also u have to leave room for improvement and the possibility of going low whilst removing blow out holes. I use it for the 3 hardest driving holes on a course.

#7 deepdivot

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:08 PM

I have used it and still taken double so it's not foolproof just good course management.

#8 2Putts

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:11 PM

As a concept personal par it is too simplistic for me. It should be refined by each golfer to take into account their own strengths and weaknesses. Most golfers can hit the green on a 150metre Par3 and two putt for par, so standing on the tee that would be a good goal. Most 12 handicapper (and many longer markers) can hit the ball 200 metres on a 340 metre Par4 leaving 140 into the green. Hitting the ball 200 metres, hitting the second shot 140 for a GIR and two putting for par would be a good and achievable goal. If the tee shot isn’t great then sure play the second shot conservatively and make sure the big number doesn’t crop up. On a Par4 of 380 metres rated in the top 4/5 on the card then yeah take less club and play for the bogie straight from the tee. We tend to achieve what we aim for so rather than resigning to a bogie on the easier holes and the Par3s; a less conservative approach on the easier holes and only taking the more conservative option on the hardest holes is a good mental approach. The 1 in 3 mentioned by DD above works for me but someone else might like to use a different ratio.

#9 Kiwi

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:20 PM

The bottom line is, we have shots on holes because we need them. If we could course par every hole everytime we played we wouldn’t have any shots.
Personal par is about being realistic and playing the game safely to our ability. You will improve a brazillion fold this way because you are eliminating the risk of big numbers.

and even Oprah likes VijayJay

there you go,

#10 2Putts

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:24 PM

Playing it safe is not the only way to improve. For some, taking on risk is a good catalyst for improvement.

#11 AB_Uncut

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:36 PM

Considering it is my concept mate (which is now also a registered trademark) I feel I should be the one to answer that for you. The beauty of "Personal Par" is it can be allowed for and achieved any a golfer sees fit. My initial design is such that there are usually 3 ways to utilise "Personal Par" 1. On distance of a hole 2. On handicap index of a hole 3. On personal assignment to holes an individual finds difficult at their home club. Now in the first paragraph mate you are bang on the money, it is a system that changes the personal GIR, so for example a difficult long Par 5 now becomes a Par 6 and the golfer has 4 shots to get onto the green and 2 regulation putts to achieved a "Personal Par" How you achieve those 4 shots onto the green is up to you as an individual golfer Weetbix, so this is where you can add your short game strokes if you wish. Using the Par 5 as an example, you might assess the hole as 3 full shots and a chip/pitch for you personal GIR. I do have methods to this system that teaches golfers how to play "Personal Par" golf, but they will be released as part of the system later this year. Personally I don't agree with a short game handicap concept, a handicap is our overall ability as a golfer in my opinion and this includes, long game, short game and putting. But that is your thing mate, so please utilise it if you feel comfortable and adapt the "Personal Par" concept to the concepts you feel aides your golf. I can understand your confusion with combining the 2 concepts, it is not initially what I designed "Personal Par" for. I will give you an insight into how I see it being used though in a nutshell and that may help you... I like to have a "scoring zone" basically this involves the clubs I feel confident in hitting well to a green or a pin. For me this is a 7i down, for others it might be a 9i for example. I hit my 7i about 165m, so my intial assessment of any hole is "What club do I need to hit from the tee to put a scoring zone club in my hands?" During a round of golf, I want as many scoring zone opportunities as I can. So for an example on a tight par 4, if I can reach my scoring zone with a hybrid, I will play hybrid off the tee and take advantage of the extra accuracy to cope with a tough tee shot. I may have been able to hit driver to wedge distance but I also may bring potential distaster into the hole if I miss. So as long as I am within my scoring zone, I have achieved my first goal. Now what if I can safely reach my scoring zone from the tee? My priority with any tee shot is to be in play at all costs, if I can't do that with driver, I hit the club I can do it with. When I have an approach with a club beyond my scoring zone range, what happens? I open my target area and create an "acceptable landing zone". Ask anyone who has played with me lately and they will vouch for the fact that I play this way. So if I am hitting 5 or 6 iron in, anywhere on the green or around the green in a "safe spot" is good enough for me. I then can take the initiative with my short game and putting to score. The difference when applied to a higher handicap? You have extra shots to play with on a hole, so why blaze away from the tee or from an approach shot position you are not comfortable with. Isn't the smarter play to be conservative and get yourself in a position to score? It is about taking "acceptable" scores on a hole as a worst result. Some have criticised this as being a negative approach but this is why it isn't... 1. You are never hitting a shot that you are not comfortable hitting - hitting shots outside your comfort zone leads to poor results that are often penal, this is how you rack up round destroying numbers. 2. You are always giving yourself an opportunity to hit a great shot that will let you score better. In play off the tee? You have a chance to hit an approach shot close. Around the green? You have a chance to hit a short game shot close. On the green? You have a chance to sink a putt. This is how you get "personal birdies and better". Put yourself out of a hole by playing above and beyond what you are capable and not only can you rack up the numbers, you take scoring opportunities out of your hands. For example: You hit it in the trees off the tee. Now I used to try and "recover" from this spot by often hitting low percentage shots. But it dawned on me that I am taking hitting the 3rd shot close out of play and holing a putt out of play. If you do not clear the trouble, you have then wasted a stroke or more. I know look to get back in play safely and give myself an opportunity to make the next shot or the resultant chip or putt the shot that rescues the hole. I never let a bad tee shot cost me more than 1 wasted shot. Hope all that makes sense, feel free to ask for any other clarifications at any time. The bottom line is "Personal Par" is about accepting your abilities as a golfer, creating realistic expectations and playing the brand of golf you can play, enjoy and improve at.

#12 Weeti

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:27 PM

Now in the first paragraph mate you are bang on the money, it is a system that changes the personal GIR, so for example a difficult long Par 5 now becomes a Par 6 and the golfer has 4 shots to get onto the green and 2 regulation putts to achieved a “Personal Par”

How you achieve those 4 shots onto the green is up to you as an individual golfer Weetbix, so this is where you can add your short game strokes if you wish. Using the Par 5 as an example, you might assess the hole as 3 full shots and a chip/pitch for you personal GIR.

That's the clarification I was particularly interested in. Assess each hole based on your individual capabilities and take the big scores out of the equation. I don't subscribe to a short game handicap system, rather my confusion arose because I couldn't see how personal par allowed for short game weakness (using the term short game to not just mean putting but also pitching and chipping). Now I get it. Cheers

#13 AB_Uncut

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:45 PM

I guess I should also state how this all came about so you all can understand why I feel strongly that "Personal Par" works... 1. It was a playing system I personally created for myself over 15 years ago when I first started playing golf. I never understood why golfers would try to shoot par scores when their skills were not developed, hence I gave myself a realistic approach to improving my scores. This resulted in me decreasing my handicap from 26 to 2 in 2 years - on the OLD handicap system! 2. When I came back to the game, I renewed the strategy that I used to use to learn the game again. There is no need for anyone to put unnecessary pressure on themselves by expecting results that are beyond their current skill levels. It still today forms the basis for how I play the game and I currently play off a +1 handicap. 3. I have been fortunate enough to work as a caddy on the bag of a tour standard professional and have caddied for him in a number of professional events. I can tell you for a fact we use something very similar to personal par during these rounds and the results have been solid. I also took this opportunity to study how other pros manage their games and practice both before, during and after tournament rounds. No they all don't strike the ball brilliantly but they manage their games brilliantly and they score even on bad days. 4. I have studied club level golfers now for over 12 months, watching their practice and playing habits. I can safely say the vast majority of golfers have the wrong idea about the game, have a dangerously flawed approach to shooting the best scores THEY possibly can. Many try shots that I would not dream of attempting with a scoring round on the line, nor would the guys I caddy for ever try. 5. I have done a full statistical study of golfers stats and the stats of the best golfers on the planet. This was personally eye opening as the way I thought the game was actually played is nothing like the requirements of solid golf. My training also was flawed in the time I devoted to skills that at the end of the day are not as important as I once believed. Since adjusting my training and approach to reflect the skills that are actually important, I have personally played the best golf I ever have, and my bad days aren't so bad any more. 6. There are a number of guys who I regularly play with or speak to who are employing some of these ideas into their games. I have seen their scores and handicaps improve significantly. Do I take credit for this? No. I am just happy to see their golf improve and if I have contributed to it in any way, I am honoured. Yes it may be conservative, yes it might not make sense, yes it is not always infallable. But it is getting results, it is making the game more enjoyable for those that have employed many of the ideas and it has made the game a more realistic challenge for golfers who have struggled with the difficulty of the game. My goal is to help as many handicap golfers play the game in a fashion that allows them enjoyment and improvement. I understand that there will be golfers who never agree with it, will never employ it and will never admit that it works. Frankly I don't care. I personally learnt long ago that you cannot help everyone and I would rather focus my attention in the future on people who do want to take a different approach to their games. The others can watch them improve and wonder how they did it. It is about smart golf and minimising the cost of your mistakes, and every golfer on the planet makes mistakes and hits poor shots. The trick is to hit less of them, learn to recover from them and learn to minimise their damage.

#14 AB_Uncut

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:49 PM

Now in the first paragraph mate you are bang on the money, it is a system that changes the personal GIR, so for example a difficult long Par 5 now becomes a Par 6 and the golfer has 4 shots to get onto the green and 2 regulation putts to achieved a “Personal Par”

How you achieve those 4 shots onto the green is up to you as an individual golfer Weetbix, so this is where you can add your short game strokes if you wish. Using the Par 5 as an example, you might assess the hole as 3 full shots and a chip/pitch for you personal GIR.

That’s the clarification I was particularly interested in. Assess each hole based on your individual capabilities and take the big scores out of the equation.

I don’t subscribe to a short game handicap system, rather my confusion arose because I couldn’t see how personal par allowed for short game weakness (using the term short game to not just mean putting but also pitching and chipping). Now I get it.

Cheers

Starting 2012 on unofficial 17, targeting to finish with a handicap without a ’teen’ in it!

Full swing and pitching: Back(swing) and down(swing) with rythmn
Chipping and putting: Set up close, still hips, feel the clubhead

Mate it is and always will be about giving yourself the easiest shots you can on the golf course. Achievable shots work more often than one in a million risks. Hopefully as this all develops and unfolds mate, the concepts and ideas will make sense to you (and others) and will result in you perhaps seeing the game in a different light. A realistic, common sense approach sometimes reveals that the game is not as monumental a task as you first believed it was. And that is what the "Personal Par" approach is all about. PS: Short game by a statistical definition is any shot under 30 yards from the green.

#15 vinum_coupe

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:56 PM

Good post AB. I'll try to think about that on the course this week.




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