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'Striping It'


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#16 Zenstb

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:38 AM

“Striping it” is a term that comes from the time when people used to make their own clubs. Each morning they would sharpen the top of their clubs with a leather strap (hence the term “blades”). If they got too many burrs in the leather, they would sometimes remove them by rubbing the leather along the sole of the club.

If the burrs were particularly bad they would actually take very small channels out of the bottom of the club. If this happened you would get “stripes” in the turf when you took a divot. As the better golfers sharpened their blades more often, they were obviously more likely to have the soles “channeled” and therefore produce “stripes” in the turf. As the better players hit the ball straighter it became a bit of a folk lore that the stripes helped you play better golf.

These stripes coined the term “striping the ball” as it was thought that you must be a good golfer if you could hit it straight.

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Scotty Cameron Kombi S 33

Dulberf gets the green Jacket. The old boys always used this term well before Tiger came along. When I was using persimmon woods 20 years ago, the old pro's use to say your striping it today through the screws boy. What they meant by screws is there was 4 screws in each corner of the sweet spot insert of the face. These screws held the sweet spot face in place. In layman's terms you hit the ball dead centre out of the sweet spot.

#17 Waggle

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 05:53 AM

I've never heard this silly term.

#18 interested_party

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:34 AM

It's the next superlative up from "piping" it. I think it goes: ripping smoking piping ....then.... striping

#19 Madam

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:40 AM

It’s the next superlative up from “piping” it. I think it goes:

ripping
smoking
piping
....then….
striping

Hey hey none of those big city words around here "superlative"!! lol

#20 Tolmij

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:41 AM

all a load of hoo har, just say what you mean. Why do we always follow the American culture, we are Ausrralian. The correct term is BONZA BLUEE, smacked that straight up the Roos crutch, or similar.

#21 Weetbix

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:47 AM

Roos crutch? I've head of the Hey Diddle and the guts, but not the Roos crutch!

#22 Johnraf

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:56 AM

crutch!!! Don't ya mean Clacker?

#23 Golfdivot

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 03:30 PM

“Striping it” is a term that comes from the time when people used to make their own clubs. Each morning they would sharpen the top of their clubs with a leather strap (hence the term “blades”). If they got too many burrs in the leather, they would sometimes remove them by rubbing the leather along the sole of the club.

If the burrs were particularly bad they would actually take very small channels out of the bottom of the club. If this happened you would get “stripes” in the turf when you took a divot. As the better golfers sharpened their blades more often, they were obviously more likely to have the soles “channeled” and therefore produce “stripes” in the turf. As the better players hit the ball straighter it became a bit of a folk lore that the stripes helped you play better golf.

These stripes coined the term “striping the ball” as it was thought that you must be a good golfer if you could hit it straight.

Titleist 910 D2 9.5* Stiff Ahina
Cleveland Launcher 1 & 3 Stiff Hybrid
4-PW Mizuno MP53 Stiff KBS Tour
Vokey 50.11
Vokey 54.12
Vokey 58.09
Scotty Cameron Kombi S 33

It seems that people believe this!!!!!!!! So....imagine I got a file and made some smallish grooves on the sole of one of my irons. A file, I said, not a piece of leather. I go out and hit a few shots. You are telling me that the small grooves on the sole would be visible in a divot? They wouldn't even be visible if I did on a fairway at Augusta, let alone a fairway from 100 years back. And in any case, the existence of a divot doesn't mean you have hit a good shot. The above post is pure invention. You'll notice that no source is quoted.

#24 smAsh

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:37 PM

^ for once I am with golfdivot. The post makes no sense at all.

#25 Golfdivot

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:05 PM

^ for once I am with golfdivot. The post makes no sense at all.

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Thanks, Smash. To those who were fooled by Dulberf's imaginary explanation, think about it for five seconds.

#26 Zenstb

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:12 PM

“Striping it” is a term that comes from the time when people used to make their own clubs. Each morning they would sharpen the top of their clubs with a leather strap (hence the term “blades”). If they got too many burrs in the leather, they would sometimes remove them by rubbing the leather along the sole of the club.

If the burrs were particularly bad they would actually take very small channels out of the bottom of the club. If this happened you would get “stripes” in the turf when you took a divot. As the better golfers sharpened their blades more often, they were obviously more likely to have the soles “channeled” and therefore produce “stripes” in the turf. As the better players hit the ball straighter it became a bit of a folk lore that the stripes helped you play better golf.

These stripes coined the term “striping the ball” as it was thought that you must be a good golfer if you could hit it straight.

Titleist 910 D2 9.5* Stiff Ahina
Cleveland Launcher 1 & 3 Stiff Hybrid
4-PW Mizuno MP53 Stiff KBS Tour
Vokey 50.11
Vokey 54.12
Vokey 58.09
Scotty Cameron Kombi S 33

It seems that people believe this!!!!!!!!
So….imagine I got a file and made some smallish grooves on the sole of one of my irons. A file, I said, not a piece of leather.
I go out and hit a few shots. You are telling me that the small grooves on the sole would be visible in a divot?
They wouldn’t even be visible if I did on a fairway at Augusta, let alone a fairway from 100 years back. And in any case, the existence of a divot doesn’t mean you have hit a good shot.
The above post is pure invention.
You’ll notice that no source is quoted.

Golf divot, Who said we believed it, I'm not sure how the word came about all I know is all the old school golf pro's back in the day used this term, it was a common word they used as well as hit it through the screws. Another saying is you striped that one down the pipe.




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