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AB: 12 months Inside the Power Zone


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#16 Groove_Snob

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 07:34 AM

About time you stopped trying to guide the ball around a course, rip into it!! "Power golf is accurate golf" ;) Good read thus far........... I noticed your not gona be using a skipping rope though, had some bad experience with them in the past?? Haha

#17 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 08:40 PM

your physical training of chin ups, push ups and squats – do you do certain amount of reps or just bust them out in one hit?

The intention is always to get them in one hit but you need to set a number initially that you can build into. So my first numbers are 20, 50 and 50... These represent realistic numbers I could achieve in one set but intially are more than I am currently capable of. So the training was first set do as many as possible, rest 30-60 secs and do as many reps as possible. This was repeated until target numbers were reached. It is important to remember though that this is preparation training for a heavy strength training load that will start later in the cycle.

#18 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 08:41 PM

About time you stopped trying to guide the ball around a course, rip into it!!

“Power golf is accurate golf” ;)

Good read thus far…........

I noticed your not gona be using a skipping rope though, had some bad experience with them in the past?? Haha

“He who’s tired of Weird Al, is tired of life!!”
-Homer Simpson

No will leave that to you mate, I hear you are a bit of a whiz on a skipping rope ;) hahaha...

#19 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 08:53 PM

UPDATE... Okay yesterday I had a conversation with Zen about where I am at and what my intentions are, also what role I was hoping he could play for me. I think this is always an important step when you begin training with an industry professional - be it a golf coach, a biomechanist or a strength and conditioning professional. It helps that Zen and I have been mates for a long time but when approaching someone who is going to play a major role in your development, it is important to let them know the following information... 1. Where you currently feel you are in your development. 2. Where you want to get to and what you want to ultimately achieve 3. What YOU are prepared to do in your training with them to reach your goal 4. What you want them to do for you. This 4 step process is critical. It allows both yourself and the professional you are working with to establish an individual plan and to be on the same page in terms of the direction you are heading. So many times before I have seen people not follow this initial step and both they and their "expert" head in different directions causing frustration for both parties. I have also given Zen and Chris permission to upload my data and information to ISG and have a role in explaining the ins and outs and functions of both my swing and what needs to be worked on. At subsequent retestings I have also invited them to discuss changes that have occurred in training and how this guides me closer to my goal. I think this is important for everyone to get an understanding of how the process functions and develops over time.

#20 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 09:17 PM

Training yesterday was another range session with a focus on power and timing. Today will be the first of my PST training sessions to work on re-establishing and developing my movement patterns. I have woken up sore today from physical conditioning training 2 days ago and I want to discuss Muscle Recovery this morning... MUSCULAR RECOVERY AND TRAINING Far too often in my time as a strength and conditioning coach have I seen people become severely over-trained, or find training becomes a chore and they drop out. Part of the problem is understanding your own physical recovery mechanisms. It is all well and dandy to have a training schedule but if your body has not achieved full recovery since the last training session is there any point? What is the goal of performing physical training? To stimulate the body to make a physical transformation (be it strength increases, muscle gain, whatever). Time and time again I see people shortcut this process by training too often and too regularly. The problem is we live in a society that is "No pain, no gain" and "The harder you work, the better the result". Unfortunately the human body though does not play by the same rules. It must be understood that physical training for the body is not a positive experience but a negative one. It causes the body trauma and stress. It is this negative stress though that causes the positive gains we are after. The body feels threatened so it adapts by creating a physical transformation to protect itself. The last thing we want to do is impose our will and short circuit the process. The body to adapt, must first fully recover. Should we impose more stress on the body before recovery has taken place, we send the body further and further into stress and alarm. Eventually we reach a point where we either suffer an injury or we get so fatigued we cannot train anymore. Think of the process as digging a hole and filling it with soil. Our training is the digging portion - the longer and harder we train the deeper we dig the hole. Now the process of recovery is basically the body refilling this hole with soil. Our results is the body bringing in some extra soil and creating a hill. If we are to build a mountain (of results) we must avoid digging again until the hole has been filled and the hill has been left. I know this is difficult for us to understand being that we have been taught that "work is a virtue" but in physical training we must show restraint. How do we know what our recovery mechanism is? 3 ways... 1. In the intial stages of our training we will get sore (I am in a world of hurt this morning and I have been training for just under 20 years). So we monitor the process. Peak soreness should arrive 48-96 hours post training, after that it will subside. Once it is totally gone, we wait 24-48 hours for adaptation to take place and then we can train again. 2. The second and more scientific way is to monitor our heart rate. Take a baseline of what your normal resting heart rate is leading up to training. As training is a stress (and so is the physical damage we cause) our heart rate remains elevated during the "stress" period. As the body recovers the heart rate will return to the normal resting rate. Once this happens recovery has occurred. We then wait 1-2 days before training again. 3. Training itself. If you do not improve on the next training session, you have trained to quickly. Remember, "if nothing changes in your training, nothing changes on you!" I have had elite athletes have rest periods as long as 12-18 days between major strength sessions. They train with such loads and intensities, it takes their bodies that long to recover and adapt. Now I know someone will bring up splitting muscle groups, so we will cover that tomorrow...

#21 Tigers_Wood

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 09:53 PM

Hey you should split muscle groups :p Seriously though, if you do say a 4 day split I'm curious how your golfing fits into that program assuming you're training in golf in and around the split. It's easy for muscle growth, because you just don't really use those muscle groups in the 7 days between the next session. In golf you don't have that luxury.

#22 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 01:40 AM

Hahaha... Thanks for that Tigers... The idea of splitting muscle groups for training is a nice one, give muscles a rest while we work other ones, seems sound and a straight forward idea.... BUT there is a problem... All humans possess 1 spinal cord and 1 brain (central nervous system) and this system connects to every muscle group we possess. Add to that the brain controls the regulation of our hormonal (endocrine) system. It doesn't care whether you have trained legs or arms, all it knows is that it has been placed under physical stress and needs to recovery. So using our hole digging analogy, the spinal cord and the brain could be likened to our give up. Dig one big hole or dig several smaller holes and it is all the same isn't it? The holes need to be filled and then built upon before we get an adaptive response. For this reason, all natural athletes I believe are best off suited to a short, intense, full body program with sufficient rest periods between sessions.... Okay how do we fit in golf training with a physical program? It is a good question. You really need to seperate these into two seperate categories because of the different characteristics of both. 1. For physical strength training we are using high levels of external load and taking exercises to total muscular fatigue (where you can't perform another repetition) LEVEL OF MUSCULAR STRESS: HIGH 2. Golf training we use a light external load (golf clubs weighing 300-500g), not taking the body anywhere near muscular fatigue, using sub maximum training and have periods of rest between repetitions. LEVEL OF MUSCULAR STRESS: LOW 3. A third type of training we will introduce is as we go is Sports Specific Training (Functional)... Loading in this form of training is relatively light (compared to maximal training), movement is dynamic in nature. Whilst there is an element of muscular fatigue, it is nowhere near the stress of our strength training protocol. LEVEL OF MUSCULAR FATIGUE: LOW - MEDIUM Basically interspersing trainings 2 and 3 in between our number 1 sessions can be helpful. Both 2 and 3 will allow our muscles to be flushed with nutrients and blood supply which aids in recovery and in flushing waste by products from the fatigued/damaged muscles. Management of training is always important. If I had a client that was due for a maximal strength session but in a few days they had a major event or game, I would increase the rest period to a few days post performance, rather in the lead up to performance. THIS IS INTERESTING.... Why do we taper athletes from high level physical training approximately 21 days prior to major competition? Because the body still gains benefits from a workout up to 21-28 days post training. And being that most athletes train with intensity for an extended training cycle, we like to allow them full recovery periods prior to competing. Many athletes note that after such a taper they are actually stronger at the competition date even though they have not engaged in physical training for an extended period. Don't ever hesitate to take more rest over too little (not an excuse to be lazy though...). Recovery times for the average adult from strength training can be from 5-9 days depending on intensity, personal recovery and training experience.

#23 Groove_Snob

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 06:51 PM

any more updates dude??

#24 AB_LongGolfer

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 08:54 PM

Not much to update mate, injured myself last week around the house - carrying a fridge on my own. Put 3 vertebrae out of alignment, still played golf the rest of the week but have just been getting treatment and rehabbing over the last week. Main updates have been thinking and discussing technique... Okay so I can update something, not exactly power related but interesting none the less. Has altered my thinking about the game in general... Interesting conversation with a young tour player about the difference between US golf and Australian golf... He stated "Australian golfers are taught to develop technically efficient golf swings and as such are some of the best ball strikers in the game. US golfers are taught to hit many balls repetitively to develop a swing that is repeatable but unique"... Fair comments so far if you look at comparisons... "US golfers though are taught to scramble from 100 yards in and learn how to score". I thought this was a very interesting look at the difference of approaches and it kind of got me thinking about how I approach the game and what I do... Another announcement: I am going to move this thread back into the AB Tees Off sticky, I will update through there and hopefully that will allow discussions to take place also. Too difficult to manage these 2 threads and I have found the lack of interaction hard to keep the direction and focus on the topic. As such I will repost this in that thread also and kickstart it back in a developmental direction.

#25 Stinkler

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 09:04 PM

Mate, carrying a fridge on your own, you silly gorilla! That's the sort of thing I do, so bloody stupid. Interesting views on the dif between US and Aus too. Heal and take care buddy, Stink.




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