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Drop Zones


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#1 Kimbo32

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 05:38 AM

It is for individual clubs to establish drop zones in various circumstances. I think each club can decide whether the drop zone should be offered as a "last resort" option or a "co-resort" (if there is such a word) option. What do most clubs do?

#2 RulesDoc

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 06:21 AM

Most clubs offers the drop zone as an additional option, but a mandatory drop zone can sometimes be necessary to protect an area. If e.g. the area around a water hazard is damaged or newly repaired, a mandatory drop zone can be used to prevent the usual drops around the hazard, but IMO a drop zone should only in special circumstances like this be mandatory.

#3 Hawkers2015

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 06:22 AM

A lot of clubs do it in a pretty half-arsed way. At many clubs someone from the green staff (who might not play golf or understand the significance of what he is doing) will paint a box and inscribe DZ in it. They may not even worked out if its a fair (equitable) spot to put it or if they have the right number of drop zones. Actually setting up a local rule to govern the drop zone is a real novelty at a fair number of clubs. Personally I like to see the drop zone as an additional option but its up to the club. The way I look at it the depending on which you rule you are talking about, the rules say you can drop at such and such a point or point(s) and you ought to be able exercie whatever options the rules make availabe to you. I understand why the committee might want to protect an area and GUR play prohibited achieves this end. The case for making using a drop zone madatory needs to be pretty compelling because you are overturing the way the rules usually operate.

#4 K K Kenny

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 06:33 AM

our club had GUR mandatory drop but ruled that you must use the drop zones. The area of GUR was about 150m long by 40m wide and sat on the inside of a dogleg on a new par 5. They divided the GUR in half and if you were in one half you had to drop in zone A and if you were in the other half you had to drop in Zone B. The GUR was to allegedly protect a few trees that had been planted and the committee not only didn't want you hitting them with a club, but didn't want you to hit them with a ball either. It meant that in many cases you had to go back up to 80m to the drop zone. Truth is the club president was a short hitter who was probably annoyed at the rest of us driving over the dogleg of this easy par 5 and hitting short irons into the green The situation lasted for probably 2 years. Finally with a change of heirarchy it was abandoned entirely Typical of single minded and uninformed people who love to get on committees and throw their weight around

#5 Shimonko

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 11:35 AM

And from a discussion here a few weeks ago, a mandatory drop zone only mandates where you can drop, not the method of relief. You can still hit from the previous position correct?

#6 RulesDoc

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 12:18 PM

No Local Rule can take the option of stroke and distance away from the player. Rule 27-1a is very clear - the player can always replay with 1 penalty stroke.

#7 Shimonko

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 07:38 PM

It's very clear now. Thx

#8 drgazgiz

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 08:10 PM

Behind the green of our 11th hole is the start of the 12th fairway at right angles, then immediately beyond that, a downhill slope to a lake. The lake would be 25 metres behind the green. It is not uncommon for a player to "skull" their approach over the green and, if hard enough, their ball will roll down into the lake. The lake is marked as a lateral hazard to the 12th fairway, but there is nowhere to take relief for a shot overshooting the 11th green that is within two club lengths of the point of entry but not nearer to the 11th hole. So the only relief option is stroke and distance. It's a perfect situation for a drop zone, but is yet to be instituted, because no-one's really bitten the bullet, and because of the continual need for marking the zone. However one approach I've seen (rather than having to repaint a "DZ" in a square with white marker paint) is to install a coloured post, and the player can drop, according to the wording of a Local Rule, within two club lengths of the post "not nearer the hole than the post". (Of course the post is an immovable obstruction, and the wording would have to be that a dropped ball could be re-dropped if the post interfered with stance and swing.) It makes a permanent zone without the maintenance. Does anyone see any problems with this approach? The advantage of a DZ square is that it can be moved to alleviate wear and tear, but I don't see that many instances that it would be necessary in this case.

#9 Hawkers2015

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 08:58 PM

Publish, You could contruct a local rule that uses a coloured post to define a drop zone. There is also no reason why the post could not be moved from time to time to even out the wear if it became necessary to do so.

#10 languid

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 01:32 AM

We have a mandatory drop zone connected with sections of garden behind and to the side of a par 3 green. The gardens are GUR Play Prohibited. It works well and avoids various problems trying to take normal relief from the gardens. The drop zone is large, about two club lengths square By using white painted pavers set at the corners of the 2 CL square the staff doesn't have to keep painting the grass. The pavers have never caused a problem in normal play or for dropping. The size of the zone means it can be kept semi-permanent, does not get too much wear at any one place, and is easy to mow with the pavers just below the level of the grass. I recommend this.




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