Jump to content


 

 

 

 

Teetime Specials

  • Pacific Harbour Golf Club - $49 (Save 44%) (WAS $89.0)
    18 Holes incl. Cart
  • Pacific Harbour Golf Club - $39 (Save 60%) (WAS $99.0)
    18 Holes incl. Cart Carts Must be Back By 5:30 no guarantee of 18 holes ON COURSE AND DRIVING RANGE Dress Regulations Suitable Attire: Ladies and Gents Tailored pants Tailored shorts (Plain Coloured Cargo Shorts will be accepted. camouflage or multi coloured cargo shorts will not be accepted) Skirts/ Skorts Collared Shirt/ Mock style Golf Shirt Anklet sport or full length socks Clean Golf shoe or flat soled sport shoe (no metal spikes) Exception: Children under the age of 12 when accompanied by a suitably attired adult may wear T-Shirt or mock style top Unsuitable Attire: Ladies and Gents Denim pants or denim shorts of any type Tracksuit pants Board shorts or elastic waist/ draw string shorts T-Shirts (of any sort) and Singlet’s Thongs, sandals or shoes without socks Football jerseys/jumpers Metal spiked and/or open toed golf shoes
  • Pacific Harbour Golf Club - $39 (Save 60%) (WAS $99.0)
    18 Holes incl. Cart Carts Must be Back By 5:30 no guarantee of 18 holes ON COURSE AND DRIVING RANGE
  • Trafalgar Golf Club - $25 (Save 0%) (WAS $25.0)
    18 Holes Walking $40 for cart hire at the club
  • Phillip Island Golf Club - $38 (Save 0%) (WAS $38.0)
    18 Holes Walking
  • Drouin Golf
    18 Holes Walking
  • Pacific Harbour Golf Club - $39 (Save 60%) (WAS $99.0)
    18 Holes incl. Cart Carts Must be Back By 5:30 no guarantee of 18 holes ON COURSE AND DRIVING RANGE Dress Regulations Suitable Attire: Ladies and Gents Tailored pants Tailored shorts (Plain Coloured Cargo Shorts will be accepted. camouflage or multi coloured cargo shorts will not be accepted) Skirts/ Skorts Collared Shirt/ Mock style Golf Shirt Anklet sport or full length socks Clean Golf shoe or flat soled sport shoe (no metal spikes) Exception: Children under the age of 12 when accompanied by a suitably attired adult may wear T-Shirt or mock style top Unsuitable Attire: Ladies and Gents Denim pants or denim shorts of any type Tracksuit pants Board shorts or elastic waist/ draw string shorts T-Shirts (of any sort) and Singlet’s Thongs, sandals or shoes without socks Football jerseys/jumpers Metal spiked and/or open toed golf shoes
Photo

What's the correct takeaway feel like?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Anth

Anth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 14 April 2003 - 08:56 PM

I've been experimenting with a new takeaway that feels like my left shoulder (I'm right handed) leads the takeaway and the triangle formed with my arms stays intact for the first 40cm or so. Prior to this I've had my arms leading the takeaway with the shoulders following, at least that's what it felt like. Can anyone shed some light on what the correct takeaway should feel like?



#2 jockotaylor

jockotaylor

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 17 April 2003 - 11:29 PM

That is how my take away feels. I try to turn my shoulder under my chin without worrying what the rest of my swing is doing. That seems to work with me. Does the new swing work for YOU?



#3 jeanmc

jeanmc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12114 posts

Posted 18 April 2003 - 12:57 AM

Seve likes using the right hand to lead the take-away...

this enforces three keys...
1) right hand (your dominant hand) syncs your takeaway by taking the left hand back as well (maintaining the triangle)
2) your right hand is also generally your 'feel' hand - you're able to 'feel' where your hands are thru the backswing...ie: proper positioning at verious steps of the backswing???
3) your 'hit' is generated by the right hand...

if that makes any sense...

I use my right hand to start off my swings... :mrgreen:



#4 Jarrod

Jarrod

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 283 posts

Posted 18 April 2003 - 08:59 AM

The correct take away should feel like the following:

Pull up to the speaker at the drive through
place your order
drive around to the window
then a chick hands you your meal
and on it goes--->



#5 jumbo

jumbo

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts

Posted 19 April 2003 - 09:09 PM

Great post Jarrod laugh.gif

After you've been handed your meal...

The left wrist ***** whilst the right bends back as opposed to cocking. Elbows must then remain on plane to the top of the backswing.



#6 choco

choco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 707 posts

Posted 16 May 2003 - 10:00 PM

A good start leads to a good swing

By Mike McGetrick With Tom Ferrell
Photography By Warren Keating

Everyone knows that it's not easy to build a good golf swing. The swing itself is a complex series of actions and reactions involving the body, hands, arms and golf club. But there are certain fundamental steps you can take to improve the power and consistency of your swing, and developing a proper takeaway is one of the most effective.

Assuming a proper setup, the takeaway is the beginning of the success or failure of the golf swing. What happens in those first three feet—as you swing the club back to waist-high—sets the stage for everything that follows. If the club gets out of position early, you're going to have to make compensations somewhere else to get it back on-plane. Fortunately, anyone with a little discipline and willingness to practice can develop a good takeaway.

Takeaway Flaws
Why is it so hard to get the golf swing started properly? Because golfers stand to the side of the ball and their natural tendency is to swing the club around the body. This conceptual flaw is responsible for the most common takeaway flaw—swinging the club too far to the inside and fanning the clubface open. In this scenario, the golfer uses too much hand action at the beginning of the swing. The left forearm rolls over the right, swinging the club inside the target line from the very beginning, opening the face and reducing the amount of body pivot. These factors add up to a loss of power and accuracy.

The other, less common, flaw I see is "lifting" the club with the hands and arms and failing to turn the body. Both of these mistakes can doom a golf swing. In a proper takeaway, the club works away from the ball, then up, as the shoulders turn and the right elbow and wrist begin to hinge. Finally, the club works around the body in response to the turn of the shoulders and pivot of the upper body. What most golfers fail to realize, however, is that the clubface remains square to the arc of the swing throughout the takeaway. With a proper pivot, the club remains in front of the body as it reaches waist-high, where the shaft is parallel to both the ground and the target line.

Takeaway Fixes
Set up for a good takeaway by improving your address position. At address (from a face-on view), you should have a good triangle formed by the hands arms and golf club. The shaft of the club should point slightly left of center. A proper grip is essential to a good takeaway. Make sure that you're holding the club in the fingers of your left hand. Also, I prefer a slightly strong grip, with the "V"s between the thumb and forefinger on both hands pointing toward the right shoulder. The clubface is perpendicular to the target line. From this square setup position, you're ready to initiate the backswing.

Tension is the enemy of a good golf swing. Be sure to always follow your preshot routine and keep your hands and arms loose by waggling the club a couple of times as you prepare for the shot. Many golfers like to begin the swing with a forward-press of the hands, hips or right knee. If you don't currently use a forward-press, experiment to see if it helps you begin the swing more smoothly.

The first move away from the ball is crucial. I teach students to feel the hands, arms, shoulders and club working together away from the ball. Whichever spine angle you established at address, it's very important that you maintain it during the takeaway. The shoulders must turn at 90-degree angles to the spine. If the spine angle is changing during the takeaway, you'll have little hope of keeping the shoulders in position.

Now you have to come back to the illusions created by standing to the side of the ball at address. The proper feel for the takeaway is that the club is going straight back from the ball, or even slightly to the outside. In reality, the club is working to the inside, but as you keep the club in front of you as the body begins its pivot, you won't feel as though it is.

Set a tee in the ground about 18 inches directly behind the ball. Swing the clubhead toward the tee, and you'll see that even when you feel you're moving the clubhead straight back, it's in fact working to the inside as the body turns. Use very little wrist hinge at the beginning of the takeaway. The wrists will naturally hinge as the pivot starts.

The test of a good takeaway comes when the club reaches waist-high. Swing to that point and stop. The shaft of the golf club should be parallel to the ground and to the target line. If the clubhead is outside the target line, work on a better pivot. If it's inside the target line, you'll need to minimize your hand action as you swing the club back. Finally, check the angle of the clubface. The heel-to-toe angle of the clubface should match the angle of your spine.

The golf club is now on-plane and ready to swing to the top of the backswing. By achieving this solid takeaway position, you're well on your way to increasing your ball-striking consistency and hitting more fairways and greens.


Palms-Facing Drill
Take a normal address position, but instead of holding a club, hold your hands about six inches apart, with the palms facing each other. Swing back, making sure to maintain the distance between your two hands. This will instill the feeling of swinging your hands, arms and shoulders in unison. Takeaway errors start when the arms and shoulders move out of sync.

Takeaway Drills
The 100-Foot Putt. It's interesting. If I ask a golfer to hit a drive about 10 yards farther than he or she normally hits it, he or she will virtually always overswing at the takeaway, rotating his or her forearms, over-turning with both the upper and lower body. But if I ask the same player to hit a 100-foot putt—long by anyone's standards—on a putting green, he or she will hardly ever make those same mistakes.

Using a putter, make the backswing required for a 100-foot putt. Now, set up to a 5-iron shot and make that same takeaway. That's the feeling of the clubface remaining square to the arc of the swing. And that's the most important characteristic of a good takeaway.

Left-Hand Drill.
Set up normally to the ball with a 5-iron. Now, remove your right hand from the handle and extend your right arm behind you, parallel to the ground and the target line. With the club in your left hand, make a normal takeaway with your hand, arms, shoulders and body, and swing the shaft of the golf club into your right palm. This drill will help you get the feel of the proper path and plane as the club works away from the ball.


1. A good takeaway begins at address. I bend from my hips, establishing a proper spine angle. My feet, knees, hips and shoulders are all parallel left to the target line. The clubface is perpendicular to the target line.

2. You can see here that the club remains in front of my torso as I swing away from the ball, with my shoulders, arms, hands and the club all working together. The clubface stays square to the arc of the swing.

3. By the time the club reaches waist-high, the pivot has begun, but the club is still in front of my torso. Notice how the heel-toe angle of the clubface matches my spine angle. I've maintained the spine angle I established at address.

1. too far inside
The most common takeaway flaw among amateurs is swinging the club too far to the inside and fanning the clubface open, leading to a loss of both power and accuracy.

2. lifting to the outside
The second most common takeaway flaw among amateur golfers is lifting the club with the hands and arms and failing to rotate the body.

the 100-ft. putt
To improve your takeaway, make several swings with your putter, imagining the motion you'd need to sink a 100-foot putt. Then, simply take a 5-iron and make that same takeaway. It's a simple drill, but it will help ingrain the feeling of the clubface remaining square to the arc of the swing—the most important characteristic of a good takeaway.



#7 comdpa

comdpa

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 174 posts

Posted 10 September 2005 - 04:05 AM

QUOTE: Anth @ Apr 14 2003, 08:56 AM

I've been experimenting with a new takeaway that feels like my left shoulder (I'm right handed) leads the takeaway and the triangle formed with my arms stays intact for the first 40cm or so. Prior to this I've had my arms leading the takeaway with the shoulders following, at least that's what it felt like. Can anyone shed some light on what the correct takeaway should feel like?


The correct takeaway is when the right forearm picks the club up on plane. Then and only then will the head remain centered...



#8 333pg333

333pg333

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 685 posts

Posted 10 September 2005 - 04:46 AM

QUOTE: Jarrod @ Apr 17 2003, 10:59 PM

The correct take away should feel like the following:
Pull up to the speaker at the drive through
place your order
drive around to the window
then a chick hands you your meal
and on it goes--->

CORRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRECCCCCCTTTTTTTTTTTTTT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! tongue.gif



#9 333pg333

333pg333

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 685 posts

Posted 10 September 2005 - 05:30 AM

This obsession with the mysterious Triangle???!!@@ By holding the club in our hands that are attached to our arms and in turn to our shoulders, we can only create a triangle. By concentrating on keeping this 'triangle' the same for the first whatever keeps us stiff and is prone to pulling us off the ball or out of our hopefully strong setup position. We also don't want to create a 'big shoulder turn' by moving our "left shoulder over our right foot", or at least have this as our driving thought.
As far as takeaway/backswing goes, try this:

Stand so you are side on to a mirror/window reflective surface. That is, if you look to your right, you can see yourself from the behind/down the line angle. Now take your address position but lift your arms up to horizontal with your shoulders. Now push left arm out and pull right arm in. That is left arm looks like you have thrown a straight left (in boxing parlance) and right is cocked ready to go. In doing this allow your left hip to move in the same direction as fist and right hip back with right side. Now bring left hand across to right hand in a top of backswing position. Look at reflection and HEY PRESTO, you are in a very solid position yet you haven't done anything. HMMM...how can this be? You haven't even thought about all that triangle stuff yet you are ready to swing down from a very solid position and you haven't made any big movements off the ball. You've got lots of room to move into the ball.
Sorry about the long explanation. It is much easier to show someone than to describe this very simple exercise. Do take 3 seconds to try it and you'll see what I mean.



#10 birdie_man

birdie_man

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1633 posts

Posted 10 September 2005 - 11:40 AM

There's a few different ways to do it really...

I may try to explain what I think later.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users